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Center for the Prevention of Youth Violence
I will NOT be a statistic
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health
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Center for the Prevention of Youth Violence

Faculty Affiliates

Harolyn Belcher, MD Harolyn Belcher
Associate Professor, Pediatrics
Kennedy Krieger (School of Medicine)
1750 E. Fairmont Ave
Baltimore, MD 21231
Phone: 443-923-5933
Fax: 443-923-5875
Email:
belcher@kennedykrieger.org

Dr. Belcher began as a fellow in Developmental Pediatrics at the Kennedy Krieger Institute in 1985. She went on to serve as assistant professor of Pediatrics at George Washington University, Children's National Medical Center in Washington, D.C., and then at University of South Florida, Department of Pediatrics, Division of Child Development in Tampa, Fla., from 1987 to 1993. Dr. Belcher continued her career as a developmental pediatrician with the Naval Medical Center in Bethesda, Md., from 1993 to 1995 before returning to Kennedy Krieger Institute as a developmental pediatrician from 1996 to the present. Dr. Belcher was an instructor in the Department of Pediatrics, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine from 1996 to 1997 and an assistant professor from 1998 to 2003. In the last quarter of 2003, Dr. Belcher was promoted to associate professor of Pediatrics and lecturer in the Department of Mental Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, and assumed the position of Director of Research at the Kennedy Krieger Institute Family Center.


Sheldon Greenberg, PhDSheldon Greenberg
 Associate Professor
Johns Hopkins University
201 North Charles Street, Suite 200
Baltimore, MD
Phone: 410-516-0770
Email:
greenberg@jhu.edu

Dr. Sheldon Greenberg is the Associate Dean and Director of the Division of Public Safety Leadership in the School of Education at Johns Hopkins University. Prior to joining JHU, Sheldon served as Associate Director of the Police Executive Research Forum (PERF) in Washington, D.C., directing the Management Services Division and providing technical assistance and intervention services to police agencies worldwide. He directed organizational assessments in over 50 major police and sheriffs’ departments.


Michael Rosenberg, PhDMichael Rosenberg
Professor
Department of Special Education
Johns Hopkins University
Room 100 Whitehead Hall
3400 N. Charles Street
Baltimore, MD 21218
Phone: 410-516-8275
Fax: 410-516-8424
Email: rosenm@jhuvms.hcf.jhu.edu

Dr. Rosenberg is a professor in the Department of Special Education at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland. Dr. Rosenberg is implementing an applied multimedia approach for comprehensive behavior management model (PAR) in educational settings. This involves the training and performance assessment of various constituencies involved in the delivery of educational services. Dr. Rosenberg is also engaged in the evaluation of a number of program initiatives involving compliance to federal requirements for students with special educational needs in urban environments. He is also coordinating the certification and licensure research team under the auspices of the recently funded Center on Personnel Studies in Special Education (COPSSE), a joint effort by Hopkins, Vanderbilt University and the University of Florida.

Dr. Altschuler’s work focuses on juvenile crime and justice system sanctioning; juvenile reentry, aftercare and parole; community-based correctional program development, implementation and assessment; and drug involvement and crime among inner-city adolescents. Dr. Altschuler’s overall objective is to contribute to the state of knowledge regarding the efficacy of community-based approaches and reintegration strategies focused on adolescents involved in corrections.


Michele Cooley, PhDM Cooley
Associate Professor, Department of Mental Health
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health
624 North Broadway
Baltimore, MD 21205
Phone: (410)955-0413
Fax: (410) 955-9088
Email:
mcooley@jhsph.edu

Dr. Cooley’s major research interests focus on preventing the mental and behavioral effects of youth’s exposure to pervasive community violence, a potential risk factor that has been identified as a significant public health problem of epidemic proportions. She  began studying exposure to community violence during her postdoctoral training because of its suspected relationship to anxiety disorders and other aspects of youth’s emotional, behavioral, and psycho-physiological functioning.  More specifically, Dr. Cooley studies the proximal and distal effects of youth’s exposure to pervasive community violence on public mental health, and she designs and implements preventive interventions in community epidemiologically-defined populations.


David Altschuler, PhD  david altschuler
Principal Research Scientist, JHU Institute for Policy Studies
Adjunct Associate Professor, Sociology, JHU School of Arts & Sciences
3100 Wyman Park Drive
Baltimore, MD 21211
Phone: (410) 516-7174
Fax: (410) 516-8233
Email:
dma@jhu.edu

Dr. Altschuler’s work focuses on juvenile crime and justice system sanctioning; juvenile reentry, aftercare and parole; community-based correctional program development, implementation and assessment; and drug involvement and crime among inner-city adolescents. Dr. Altschuler’s overall objective is to contribute to the state of knowledge regarding the efficacy of community-based approaches and reintegration strategies focused on adolescents involved in corrections.


Anne Duggan, ScD
Professor, Department of Pediatrics
Johns Hopkins School of Medicine
202 Reed Hall
Baltimore, MD
Phone: (410) 614-0912
Fax: (410) 614-5431
Email:
aduggan@jhmi.edu

Dr. Duggan is an associate professor of pediatrics at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and holds a joint appointment in the Department of Health Policy and Management of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. She is director of the Johns Hopkins General Pediatrics Research Center and director of Research Training in General Pediatrics. Dr. Duggan is principal investigator of an ongoing six-year experimental study of Hawaii’s Healthy Start Program and has initiated preliminary statewide research on the process and outcomes of early childhood services system change in Hawaii.


Stephen Plank, PhDplank
Associate Professor, Sociology Department                
School of Arts & Sciences
Johns Hopkins University
3400 N. Charles Street
Mergenthaler 560
Baltimore, MD  21218-2685
Phone: 410-516-7633
Fax: 410-516-7590
Email:
splank@jhu.edu

Dr. Plank is an associate professor in Johns Hopkins University’s Department of Sociology, and co-director of the Baltimore Education Research Consortium (BERC).  Dr. Plank received his doctorate in sociology from the University of Chicago (1995).  He received a bachelor’s degree in mathematical methods in the social sciences, and sociology, from Northwestern University (1990).  His published education research includes Finding One’s Place: Teaching Styles and Peer Relations in Diverse Classrooms (Teachers College Press, 2000), and articles in the American Educational Research Journal, Teachers College Record, Journal of Vocational Education Research, and Sociology of Education (forthcoming).  Much of his past and current research focuses on solutions to the problem of high school dropouts, predictors of successful transitions to college, and school climate.


Jon S. Vernick, JD, MPHJon S. Vernick, JD, MPH
Associate Professor and Co-Director
The Johns Hopkins Center for Gun Policy & Research
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health
624 N. Broadway
Baltimore, MD 21205
Phone: 410-955-7982
Fax: 410-614-9055
Email:
jvernick@jhsph.edu

Dr. Vernick’s research focuses on the use of law and legal interventions to further public health and injury prevention goals. Dr. Vernick concentrated on the ways in which science, law, regulation, and litigation can work together to reduce the incidence and severity of injuries, particularly those caused by firearms and motor vehicles. Furthemore, he evaluated the effects of various laws to prevent firearm and other injuries and also examined constitutional and other legal issues associated with injury prevention.