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Center for Adolescent Health

Center Projects

CookShop Evaluation

Cookshop is a nutrition education program implemented by the Foodbank of New York City that targets low-income families to increase their knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors regarding healthy food consumption. The goal of our study is to conduct a process evaluation and a longitudinal impact evaluation of two Cookshop projects: Cookshop Classroom and Cookshop Families, which target early elementary school students and their parents in the NYC public schools. Data collection included qualitative and quantitative methodologies with parents, students, and school personnel. Qualitative data includes in-depth interviews, focus groups, and cafeteria observations recorded through digital photography. The quantitative data included multiple surveys collected through IPADS and/or online surveys.

Center Researchers:
Beth Marshall: bmarshal@jhsph.edu
Kristin Mmari: kmmari1@jhu.edu

Well-being of Adolescents in Vulnerable Environments

The WAVE study is funded by AztraZeneca with the goal of examining how disadvantaged adolescents in different urban environments define the meaning of health and ill health, and to describe where adolescents go for health information and services, as well as the barriers they face in seeking or accessing help. Each site (Baltimore, Rio, Johannesburg, Shanghai, Dehli, and Ibadan) collected qualitative data with young people aged 15-19 years and the adults who work with them. In addition each site collected survey data using respondent driven sampling.

Center Researchers:
Beth Marshall: bmarshal@jhsph.edu
Kristin Mmari: kmmari1@jhu.edu

Project Connect

A cooperative agreement with the CDC to train youth-serving professionals who work with young men on a clinical guide (Y2CONNECT). The aim is to increase the proportion of young African-American and Latino men (including young men who have sex with men [YMSM]) who receive quality sexual and reproductive health care in Baltimore.

Center Researchers:
Arik Marcell: amarcell@jhu.edu

Teen Pregnancy Prevention Initiative (TPPI) Evaluation

The Center is working with the Baltimore City Health Department to evaluate the City’s TeenPregnancy Prevention Initiative (TPPI).TPPI is a component of the B’More for Healthy Babiesand works to reduce teen births by improving young people’s access to age-appropriate and evidence-based health education, medically appropriate clinical services, and opportunities to engage their communities and grow as civic leaders.TPPI activities include the Know What You Want campaign, the Youth Advisory Council (YAC), and a multi-agency effort to increase access to Long Acting Reversible Contraceptives (LARCs).The Center has long served as a member of the TPPI coalition and is now evaluating TPPI’s activities as well as the coalition functioning.

Center Researchers:
Beth Marshall: bmarsha2@jhu.edu
Terri Powell:twilliams@jhu.edu

UChoose Teen Pregnancy Prevention Program

Baltimore City’s UChoose Coalition, led by the Baltimore City Health Department (BCHD), intends to decrease the overall teen birth rate of 43.3 per 1,000 teen girls by 30 percent by the end of the five-year project through reductions in disparities among African American and Hispanic teens, and to ensure sustainable delivery of evidence-based teen pregnancy prevention (TPP) programs in Baltimore City. Through this project, BCHD in partnership with the Baltimore City Schools and a network of seven Title X clinics, plans to reach 15,890 adolescents aged 12-19 each year with evidence-based TPP programs implemented in middle schools, high schools, and Title X clinics in Baltimore City. UChoose will implement It’s Your Game in middle schools, Be Proud! Be Responsible! in high schools and Seventeen Days in the clinics. The Center is conducting the implementation evaluation of all project activities.

Center Researchers:
Beth Marshall: bmarsha2@jhu.edu
Terri Powell:twilliams@jhu.edu
Kristin Mmari: kmmari1@jhu.edu

Integrating Age Appropriate Reproductive Health into Schools

Through school-based trials and a citywide monitoring system, The Center’s Core research project will:

The research project will aim to examine both the impact of age appropriate sexual health education on health risk behaviors as well as school attendance and academic performance among adolescents. Additionally, we will be examining the school and community level factors on fidelity. The study information will be used to improve efforts to increase positive adolescent health, health behaviors and well-being.

Center Researchers:
Beth Marshall: bmarsha2@jhu.edu
Terri Powell:twilliams@jhu.edu
Phil Leaf:pleaf@jhu.edu

Rales Center for the Integration of Health and Education

The Ruth and Norman Rales Center for the Integration of Health and Education is redesigning school-based health programs to improve the health and thus the academic achievements and lifelong prospects for youth from low-income communities.The first fully integrated school-based health model in the United States, called “READY” (Rales Educational and Health Advancement of Youth) breaks down historical silos between educational and health-related activities. Weaving comprehensive health services and wellness programming into the school environment helps children thrive and achieve academic success.

READY offers a fundamentally new way of viewing primary care, wherein health (including mental health and oral health) services, wellness programming and prevention, and health education are delivered in the school setting, in partnership with teachers, administrators and parents. More information is available at The Rales Center website.

Center Researchers:
Beth Marshall: bmarsha2@jhu.edu