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FAQ

What services does the Career Services Office offer?

What are the typical industries in which graduates are employed?

Who are some of the employers that recruit graduates from the School?

What are the typical salaries for a graduate of the School?

In which geographic regions do graduates of the School work?

How do students find part-time jobs while at School?

Can students use the services that the Career Services Office provides after they graduate?

Can the Career Services Office help international students?

What is the career outlook for public health jobs? What kind of job can I get with a public health degree?

When should students get started on their job search?

How do I find volunteer opportunities in Baltimore?

How can new students learn more about Baltimore?

Does SOURCE help student groups?

Are there internships available with community organizations?

I’d like to have the opportunity to volunteer in a clinical setting. Do these opportunities exist?

Is SOURCE only for students?

What constitutes a disability?

What do I need to do to register for Disability Services?

Do I need to notify my instructors of my disability?

What documentation do I need to submit in order to be accommodated?

When should I send in my documentation to the Disability Services office?

How long does it take to review the documentation?

Are students who register for accommodations looked upon unfavorably by faculty/instructors/other students?

Do you refer students to clinicians to be diagnosed?

What should I do if I suspect I have a disability and want to receive accommodations?

What are the support services provided by the Student Life Office?

What is the Diversity Summer Internship Program (DSIP)?

How do I apply for the Diversity Summer Internship Program?

As a prospective minority student interested in meeting diverse faculty and students, whom do I contact for assistance?

What scholarship opportunities are available for underrepresented minority applicants and current students?

Are there any multi-cultural graduate student organizations?

 

What services does the Career Services Office offer?

Career Services provides the following services to students and alumni:

Resume/CV and Job Search Assistance: Individual counseling and resume/CV/cover letter critiques by appointment.

JHSPHConnect: 24-hour online career management system (eRecruiting) open to students, alumni, and employers, http://jhsph.erecruiting.com. Students and alumni can post a resume/CV for the more than 2000 employers that use the system; receive new job announcements directly from the system via email; and view upcoming events using the calendar function. Employers can post open positions, and have access to resume books for recruiting public health’s best talent.

Career Resource Library: Reference books, guides and videotapes on the career process: interviewing, resume and cover letter writing, salary negotiations. Resources may be signed out for two business nights. $1.00 per day fines for overdue library resources.

Career Development Workshops: Topics include resume/CV/cover-letter writing, interviewing, networking. Current schedule can be found at the Workshops and Seminars schedule for Spring 2008.

Online Handouts and Career Management Modules: The office provides several handouts and one-hour PowerPoint workshops to students and alums. Students who view these workshops and handouts will be more effective in identifying, competing for, and succeeding in professional employment so that ultimately they can better serve the public's health.

Public Health Career Fair (First Friday in March): Employers from many sectors meet students on campus to discuss agency functions, job/internship opportunities, and career information. Approximately 50 agencies are usually represented.

International Health Resources:

  • International Career Employment Weekly and Public Health Jobs Worldwide. More than 600 current openings in the United States and abroad (in the office).
  • Public Health Jobs Worldwide. A biweekly publication listing more than 600 current jobs in U.S. and international organizations (through eRecruiting).
  • Going Global. A career guide (2-volume set) to 23 countries that includes employment websites; resume/CV samples specific to that country; work permit/visa regulations; cost of living; and cultural advice and interview tips.

What are the typical industries in which graduates are employed?

Hospital or other health care facilities; association, foundation, voluntary/non-profit; consulting firms; military; federal government (U.S. or foreign, or regional administrative/service office); health department (state or local); other state/local government, industrial or commercial firms and university (teaching, research, administration and non-hospital) settings.

Who are some of the employers that recruit graduates from the School?

Because of the diversity of disciplines in the School our graduates are employed at many different types of organizations. Some organizations that actively recruit our graduates are: CDC/EIS Program & HRMO, CDC Public Health Prevention Service, CDC Center for Health Statistics, Cleveland Dept. of Public Health, Environ, International Corporation, Family Health International (FHI), Henry M. Jackson Foundation, ICF Consulting, International Medical Corps (IMC), Jhpiego. For additional agencies: Public Health Marketplace.

What are the typical salaries for a graduate of the School?

Graduates’ salaries are based on their discipline, their geographic location, and their work experience. Because of the diversity of the School, salaries of graduates vary. As a general rule for public health jobs, entry-level positions range from $55,000–$65,000, while mid-career positions range from $70,000–85,000, and upper level positions start at $80,000 and continue up to $120,000 or more.

In which geographic regions do graduates of the School work?

Fifty-two percent of employed 2007 graduates reside in the Baltimore/Washington D.C. metro area, and 19 percent have pursued careers in other East Coast areas. Approximately 17 percent are working internationally, 5 percent in the middle U.S. states and 7 percent on the West Coast.

How do students find part-time jobs while at School?

The Career Services Office posts part-time jobs on JHSPHConnect. Students interested in federal work study positions should contact Student Financial Services. In addition, we recommend that students view the Johns Hopkins University Job Listing website. Finally, we suggest that students contact faculty members to see if they need assistance for their projects. A listing of faculty and their areas of interest is on the School’s website.

Can students use the services that the Career Services Office provides after they graduate?

Yes, alumni are welcome to use the services that we offer at no cost.

Can the Career Services Office help international students?

Yes, we assist international students with developing a plan for securing employment. Students should contact the Office of International Student, Faculty and Staff Services to talk through visa issues. We help international students identify organizations that typically hire foreign nationals in public health positions.

What is the career outlook for public health jobs? What kind of job can I get with a public health degree?

The job outlook for public health jobs is good. The recent outbreaks of disease, major disasters, the threat of bioterrorism, and the change in the demographics of the world population has moved the public health profession into the forefront. New funding is becoming available for programs dealing with HIV/AIDS, biosurveillance, and environmental concerns. Therefore the job market in public health has been steady. Public health jobs are available on the Association of Schools of Public Health’s job site.

When should students get started on their job search?

It is generally suggested that one begins six months before graduation. We recommend students start immediately building a network of individuals in their areas of interest, which will provide key contacts who can assist in the job search.

How do I find volunteer opportunities in Baltimore?

View SOURCE’s online list of partnering community-based organizations to learn more about their missions and the types of involvement that exists. The list is organized by topical area and contains contact information for each organization. Again, meeting with SOURCE staff can help you sort through this list and find the most up-to-date and meaningful experience for your individual needs.

Set up a one-on-one meeting with the staff at SOURCE. With our knowledge of the nearly 100 community-based organizations we partner with, as well as the many community-focused student groups and projects across campus, we can help you find the opportunity that best fits your individual interests and goals.

Sign up for the SOURCE Weekly Service Scoop, a weekly newsletter that summarizes the many different events and volunteer opportunities across Baltimore.

How can new students learn more about Baltimore?

Throughout the year, SOURCE offers many events designed to introduce students to the Baltimore community, including Baltimore Week and community tours. New students can visit our “Get to Know Baltimore” page.

Does SOURCE help student groups?

Yes. While SOURCE does not have extensive funding to support student groups, we can serve in a consulting capacity and would be happy to meet with your group about getting involved in the community. Partnering student groups can also utilize our office space, storage, fax and copy machines, and mailboxes. SOURCE also can help co-sponsor events, and utilize our extensive networks to plan and advertise events.

Are there internships available with community organizations?

View this link to SOURCE’s website for more information on finding or creating internships in the community.

I’d like to have the opportunity to volunteer in a clinical setting. Do these opportunities exist?

In order to volunteer clinically, students must be supervised by a faculty member from their school. This is a matter of ethics, as well as liability and insurance. Be sure that you communicate this requirement to any volunteer agency if they do not already adhere to it. Some clinical opportunities already exist in which faculty regularly volunteer their time. You can volunteer at clinics and community health centers, but not doing clinical tasks.
 
Is SOURCE only for students?

SOURCE also provides a wide range of services and support to faculty, as well as to the community agencies we partner with. We also work closely with alumni, faculty, staff, community members, student groups, individual students, administrators, and other constituencies to learn more about issues in Baltimore and engage in tackling those issues. Most of SOURCE’s events are open to the public, and we encourage all members of the community to attend to provide a diverse perspective in the learning that takes place.

What constitutes a disability?

A disability is defined in the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 as a mental or physical impairment which substantially limits one or more major life activities.  Learning is an example of a major life activity. If you have a mental or physical condition, a history of such a condition, or a condition which may be considered by others as substantially limiting, you may have a legally defined disability.

What do I need to do to register for Disability Services?

Students must submit a Request for Accommodation of Disability form to the director of disability support services, along with official documentation from a qualified professional, such as a physician.

Do I need to notify my instructors of my disability?

No. At the beginning of each term, (by no later than the end of Add/Drop), students must bring/send a copy of their course schedule to the director of disability support services, who will notify instructors, in writing, of the students’ special needs. However, students are encouraged to discuss their needs with professors as a measure of advocating for themselves.

What documentation do I need to submit in order to be accommodated?

The documentation, depending on the type of disability, must be recent, no more than three years old. Please consult the Documentation Guidelines, or contact the DSS Director for further specification.

When should I send in my documentation to the Disability Services office?

Documentation may be submitted to the DSS Director at any time; however, we ask that you leave a margin of at least three (3) weeks prior to the intended start of the accommodation in order to provide adequate time for review and processing of the request.

How long does it take to review the documentation?

Peggy Hayeslip, Director, ADA Compliance and Disability Services for the University, reviews all documentation for Johns Hopkins University students. The time it takes to review documentation and determine eligibility varies depending on a number of factors, such as the number of requests being processed at the time, the complexity of the documentation and whether it contains sufficient information.

Are students who register for accommodations looked upon unfavorably by faculty/instructors/other students?

No. Professors and instructors at the School are not informed of the type of disability that a student has, only of the needed accommodations.

Do you refer students to clinicians to be diagnosed?

We can provide a list of diagnosticians in the Baltimore/Washington area. It is the student's responsibility to provide or pay for the cost of this documentation.

What should I do if I suspect I have a disability and want to receive accommodations?

If you suspect you have a disability that is affecting your academic performance, you will need to provide documentation of that disability to the director of Disability Support Services (DSS). This documentation must be supplied by a qualified professional who is licensed or certified to diagnose the disability in question. An appointment should be scheduled with DSS after review of the documentation to discuss the need for accommodation services.

What are the support services provided by the Student Office?

  • Develop and promote collaborative seminars and special events that foster an inclusive, community building campus climate where diverse cultures are valued
  • Assist admissions in providing outreach to prospective underrepresented minority students interested in health science careers
  • Facilitate research opportunities through a Diversity Summer Internship Program

Gain more information about the Student Life Office at www.jhsph.edu/student_affairs/diversity

What is the Diversity Summer Internship Program (DSIP)?

DSIP is a 10-week residential program that provides public health and biomedical experience in Hopkins research labs to diverse groups, including underrepresented and economically disadvantaged students who have completed two or more years of college. A stipend and housing is provided.

How do I apply for the Diversity Summer Internship Program?

Applications are available online November 1–February 1.

As a prospective minority student interested in meeting diverse faculty and students, whom do I contact for assistance?

Send inquiries to the Student Life Office staff.

What scholarship opportunities are available for underrepresented minority applicants and current students?

Please review internal and external student funding resources.

Are there any multi-cultural graduate student organizations?

Yes. Please review the Student Assembly’s full listing of student groups.