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October 28, 2005

Eric Noji Named to Institute of Medicine

Eric K. Noji, MD, MPH, a senior associate with the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health’s Department of International Health, has been elected into the Institute of Medicine (IOM) of the National Academies. Noji has “played a significant role in establishing the scientific basis for the rapidly developing discipline of disaster medicine,” according to IOM President Harvey Fineberg. Noji, a medical officer with the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, is one of 64 new members elected October 24, 2005.

Eric Noji, MD, MPH

Eric K. Noji, MD, MPH

Noji’s work focuses on the medical and public health response to natural and biological disasters, including complex humanitarian emergencies and terrorism. He also develops methods to rapidly assess healthcare needs in disasters and casualty estimation models for different types of disasters. He also has done epidemiologic studies of injuries, illnesses and medical responses after several recent natural disasters and humanitarian crises. Noji is the author or co-author of over 130 scientific articles and publications on toxicological emergencies, disaster medicine and disaster epidemiology, including the recently published “Public Health Consequences of Disasters.”

Candidates are elected to the IOM for their major contributions to health care, medical science and public health. As members, they work with the Institute on committees and studies that address a broad range of health policy issues. Election is considered one of the highest honors in the fields of medicine and health.

Gabor D. Kelen, MD, professor and chair of the Johns Hopkins Department of Emergency Medicine, was also among the 64 new members elected to the IOM.

Other members of the School faculty previously elected to the Institute of Medicine include Robert Black, MD, MPH, the Edgar Berman professor and chair of International Health; Ruth Faden, PhD, MPH, the Philip Franklin Wagley Professor in Biomedical Ethics in the Department of Health Policy and Management; Manning Feinleib, MD, MPH, DrPH, professor of Epidemiology; Linda Fried, MD, professor of Epidemiology; Leon Gordis, DrPH, MPH, professor of Epidemiology; Diane Griffin, MD, PhD, the Alfred and Jill Sommer Professor and Chair of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology; Bernard Guyer, MD, MPH, the Zanvyl Krieger Professor in Children's Health in the Department of Population and Family Health Sciences; Robert Lawrence, MD, associate dean for Professional Practice and Programs and Edyth H. Schoenrich Professor in Preventive Medicine; Paul McHugh, MD, professor of Mental Health; Neil Powe, professor of Epidemiology and Health Policy and Management; Jonathan Samet, MD, the Jacob I and Irene B. Fabrikant Professor in Health, Risk and Society and chair of Epidemiology; Alfred Sommer, MD, MHS, dean emeritus of the Bloomberg School of Public Health and professor of Epidemiology; Barbara Starfield, MD, MPH, university distinguished service professor of Health Policy and Management; Donald Steinwachs, PhD, the Fred and Julie Soper Professor in Health Policy and Management; Carl Taylor, MD, DrPH, MPH, professor of International Health; Henry Wagner, MD, professor of Environmental Health Sciences; and Edward Wallach, MD, professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

Public Affairs media contacts for the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health: Kenna Lowe or Tim Parsons at 410-955-6878 or paffairs@jhsph.edu.