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June 15, 2004

Griffin Named to American Academy of Microbiology

Diane E. Griffin, MD, PhD, professor and chair of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health’s Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, has been elected to Fellowship in the American Academy of Microbiology.

Dr. Griffin was recognized by the Academy for her achievements in studying alphaviruses, which are pathogenic to mammals and birds. She is studying Sindbis virus, an alphavirus that causes encephalitis in mice, and she is working to identify the gene that is an important determinant of susceptibility to fatal forms of the disease. Dr. Griffin also discovered that measles suppresses the replication of HIV. Her efforts in identifying the mechanism that allows this suppression will help in the development of improved measles vaccines, especially for young infants.

The mission of the American Academy of Microbiology is to recognize scientific excellence and foster knowledge and understanding in the microbiological sciences. The Academy is the honorific leadership group within the American Society for Microbiology, the world’s oldest life science organization.

Fellows of the American Academy of Microbiology are elected annually through a highly selective, peer-reviewed process, based on their records of scientific achievement and original contributions that have advanced microbiology. There are now just over 2,000 Fellows representing 37 countries and all subspecialties of microbiology, including basic and applied research, teaching, public health and industry and government service.

Carol W. Greider, PhD, the Daniel Nathan Professor and Director of the Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, was also elected to the Academy.

Public Affairs media contacts for the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health: Kenna Lowe or Tim Parsons at 410-955-6878 or paffairs@jhsph.edu. Photographs of Diane Griffin are available upon request.