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October 7, 2011

New Action Guide Offers Strategies to Reduce Alcohol Outlet Density

A new publication, Strategizer 55—Regulating Alcohol Outlet Density: An Action Guide, outlines available evidence-based community prevention strategies shown to decrease the consequences associated with alcohol outlet density, the concentration of bars, restaurants serving alcohol, and liquor and package stores in a given geographic area.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Community Guide to Preventive Services has endorsed reducing alcohol outlet density as an effective strategy for reducing alcohol-related harms.

Developed by the Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America (CADCA) in partnership with the Center on Alcohol Marketing and Youth (CAMY) at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, the guide provides public health departments, community coalitions and other organizations with information and tools for community action designed to regulate and limit the number of places that serve and sell alcohol.

“Excessive alcohol use is a major public health concern and limiting the physical availability of alcohol is one of the most effective ways to reduce excessive drinking and its many health and social problems,” said David Jernigan, PhD, the CAMY director and associate professor at the Bloomberg School’s Department of Health, Behavior and Society. “This action guide shows how people can transform their community so that excessive drinking is the exception, not the rule.”

“Communities with a large concentration of bars and liquor stores pose a risk to both young people and adults, increasing the likelihood for violence or alcohol-impaired driving. Fortunately, we know from research that by limiting the number of alcohol outlets and their proximity to each other we can reduce the many health and social consequences associated with excessive drinking. This new publication—and the corresponding training curricula we’ve built in partnership with CAMY—will give communities the tools they need to craft local strategies that reduce alcohol problems,” said CADCA Chairman and CEO General Arthur T. Dean.

Among the findings in Strategizer 55--Regulating Alcohol Density: An Action Guide are

“Strategic partnerships between community coalitions and health departments can effectively reduce alcohol outlet density at the local level,” said Jernigan. “People have the power to make their neighborhoods healthier and safer.”

The new alcohol outlet density Strategizer and other resources are available on the CAMY website, http://www.camy.org/action/Outlet_Density, class="MsoHyperlink"and on the CADCA website, at http://www.cadca.org/resources/series/Strategizer.   

Media contact, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health : Tim Parsons, director of Public Affairs, at 410-955-7619 or  tmparson@jhsph.edu.
Media contact, CADCA: Natalia Martinez-Duncan at 703-706-0560.