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Faculty Directory

Cheri C. Wilson, MHS

Program Director, Culture-Quality-Collaborative (CQC) and Clearview Organizational Assessments-360 (COA360)

Assistant Scientist

Departmental Affiliation(s):

Health Policy and Management

Contact Information

624 N. Broadway
Room 312
Baltimore , Maryland   21205
US        

443-287-0305
410-614-8964

Education

MHS , Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health , 2010
MA , University of Minnesota , 1997

Overview

Cheri C. Wilson received a BA in Russian from Howard University, an MA in Russian Area Studies from the University of Minnesota, was a PhD candidate (ABD) in Russian history at the University of Minnesota, and received an MHS in Health Finance and Management from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.  Since 2010, Ms. Wilson has been a Faculty Research Associate in the Department of Health Policy and Management in the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Hopkins Center for Health Disparities Solutions (HCHDS). She is the Program Director for the Culture-Quality-Collaborative (CQC) and the Clearview Organizational Assessments-360 (COA360).  Previously, Ms. Wilson was an Acting Assistant Director of the Quality Improvement Department at The Johns Hopkins Hospital. She is a Certified Professional in Healthcare Quality (CPHQ) and a Past President of the Maryland Association for Healthcare Quality (MAHQ) (2009). 

She was recently appointed to the Health Disparities Subcommittee, Advisory Committee to the Director, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Ms. Wilson co-chairs the Public Policy and Advocacy Committee of the National Association of Health Services Executives (NAHSE). She represents the HCHDS as an At-Large Member of the Steering Committee of the American Medical Association (AMA) Commission to End Health Care Disparities (CEHCD) and serves on the Research and Data Resource Committee. Ms. Wilson is also a member of the Gay and Lesbian Medical Association (GLMA), where she serves on the Cultural Competence and Education Outreach Subcommittee. She is a member of the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, Office of Minority Health and Health Disparities, Maryland Health Disparities Collaborative, where she serves on three workgroups. In addition, Ms. Wilson is a member of the Maryland Health Quality and Cost Council (MHQCC), Cultural and Linguistic Competency Workgroup, the Maryland Health Information Exchange Policy Board, and the Maryland Health Care Commission Maryland Medical Care Database Workgroup for Reporting Utilization by Race, Ethnicity, and Language.

Ms. Wilson educates clinical and support staff in healthcare organizations, public health, medical, and nursing students as well as K-12 students and community members. She has presented at national, state, and local conferences on the issues of cultural competency, overcoming language barriers, and health disparities. The focus of her work is primarily upon the intersection between cultural competency and health disparities and patient safety and healthcare quality. Ms. Wilson is particularly interested in health disparities as it relates to racial/ethnic, language, and sexual minorities and the provision of culturally competent patient-centered care in language understandable to all patients.

  • Behavioral health equity
  • Cultural competency
  • Culturally and linguistically appropriate services (CLAS)
  • Ethnicity
  • Gender identity
  • Health communication
  • Health disparities
  • Health equity
  • Health inequality
  • Health literacy
  • Healthcare quality
  • Lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender (LGBT)
  • Limited English proficiency (LEP)
  • Maternal and child health
  • Minority health
  • Patient demographic data and meaningful use of electronic health records (EHRs)
  • Patient-provider communication
  • Patient safety
  • Public health
  • Race
  • Socioeconomic status
  • Unconscious bias in health care
  • C Wilson. “Patient Safety and Healthcare Quality: The Case for Language Access.” International Journal of Health Policy and Management 2013; 4: 251-253.