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Meghan Bridgid Moran, PhD

  • Assistant Professor

Departmental Affiliations

Contact Information

624 N. Broadway
Hampton House 706
Baltimore, Maryland 21205

410-614-6872

SciVal Research Profile

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Education

PhD, University of Southern California, 2009
MA, University of Southern California, 2007

Overview

 

I am a health communication scholar studying how health information can best be communicated to individuals in different contexts and through different channels. I study both micro-level processes of persuasion and social influence, as well as the more macro-level health communication that occurs in society. I am particularly interested in how media and pop culture influence health. Tobacco control is the primary context in which I have focused my research. I am specifically interested in how media and pop culture influence tobacco use among adolescents and young adults, and how these influences can be used to inform and implement tobacco use prevention interventions. My first on-going project in this area, funded by a K01 award from NIDA/FDA, examines how persuasive marketing tactics used in tobacco ads influences youth tobacco use. My second on-going project examines how tobacco use varies by youth peer crowd/subculture and how tobacco use prevention interventions can leverage peer crowds to develop and target materials. These research areas leverage my expertise in persuasion, message design, media effects and health behavior. 
A second area of focus has been cervical cancer prevention and detection. I have participated as a co-investigator on NCI-funded R01 and TR01 studies that examined disparities in cervical cancer preventive behavior and treatment. I am particularly interested women’s perceptions of HPV vaccination and HPV vaccination communication and have studied novel strategies for communicating information about cervical cancer screening and prevention. I have also studied how media influence individuals' beliefs about vaccines more generally. I use a wide variety of methods in my work, including experiments, focus groups, content analysis and large-scale surveys.

 

 

Honors and Awards

PHEHP (Public Health Education and Health Promotion section of APHA) Health Education Materials Contest Award for The Tamale Lesson

Top research presentation award, D.C. Area Health Communication Conference

 

  • health communication, health promotion, health education, persuasion, social influence, media, media effects, pop culture, social norms, tobacco use, tobacco control, tobacco marketing, adolescent health, health disparities, cervical cancer, HPV, HPV vaccination, vaccine hesitancy

Selected publications

  • Moran, M.B. & Sussman, S. (2014). Translating the link between social identity and health behavior into effective health communication strategies: An experimental application using anti-smoking advertisements. Health Communication. 29, 1057-66. PMID: 24447056

    Moran, M.B. & Sussman, S. (2014). Translating the link between social identity and health behavior into effective health communication strategies: An experimental application using anti-smoking advertisements. Health Communication. 29, 1057-66. PMID: 24447056
  • Moran, M.B. & Sussman, S. (2014). Changing attitudes toward smoking and smoking susceptibility through peer crowd targeting: More evidence from a controlled study. Health Communication. PMID: 25204200

  • Moran, M.B., Murphy, S., & Sussman, S.  (2012). Campaigns and Cliques: Variations in Effectiveness of an anti-smoking campaign as a function of adolescent peer group identity.  Journal of Health Communication, 17(10), 1215-1231. PMID: 23066900

  • Moran, M.B., Murphy, S.T., Frank, L. & Baezconde-Garbanati, L. (2013). Narrative communication as an innovative mechanism for impacting perceptions of health-related social norms. International Review of Social Research, 3(2), 131-49. PMID: 24179677

  • Murphy, S.T., Frank, L.B., Chatterjee, J., Moran, M.B., Zhao, N. & Baezconde-Garbanati, L. Comparing the relative efficacy of narrative versus non-narrative health messages in reducing health disparities using a randomized trial. In press at American Journal of Public Health.