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Population, Family and Reproductive Health

Master of Science in Public Health / Peace Corps Master's International (MSPH/PCMI)

The MSPH in combination with the Peace Corps Master’s International (MSPH/PCMI) program is designed for students who wish to combine rigorous academic coursework with a rewarding volunteer experience through the Peace Corps. The benefits of completing the MSPH/PCMI program include an unparalleled educational experience at JHSPH; the opportunity to develop skills necessary for the global marketplace; job placement support after completion of the program through the Peace Corps; and advantages in federal employment.

Individuals interested in participating in the MSPH/PCMI program at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health have the option of applying through either the Department of Population, Family and Reproductive Health (PFRH) or through the Department of International Health. Applicants interested in applying through International Health can find more information at the Peace Corps's website

Students will begin their program by completing nine months of coursework at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, followed by a 2-3 month Peace Corps project orientation, and finally 24 months of volunteer service. Students will receive the MSPH degree after the successful completion of 680 hours of Peace Corps Volunteer Service (this does not include the 2-3 month training period), and the completion of the MSPH Essay, for a total of 96 academic units. Students in the department of Population, Family and Reproductive Health will complete the same course requirements as the MSPH program

PFRH MSPH Coursework

MSPH program requirements include completion of four academic terms totaling 64 units; completion of a culminating master’s essay; and completion of master’s presentation. MSPH/PCMI students would follow the program guidelines for the one-year MSPH program.

MSPH/MI COURSE REQUIREMENTS

Peace Corps Project Orientation and Volunteer Service
After completing initial coursework and receiving a Peace Corps placement, the participating student will travel to her or his assigned site and begin training. Once overseas, participants are given an assignment according to the needs and requests of the host country. Participating faculty recognize that while overseas, the student’s primary responsibility is the project and community to which they have been assigned. Students will receive 32 academic units for completing 680 hours of Peace Corps Service. For more information regarding Peace Corps Volunteer Service or on applying to the Masters International Program, please contact:

Debra Timmons at Peace Corps Headquarters
VRS/DP/MI
1111 20th Street, NW Washington, DC 20526
Phone: 800-424-8580 ext. 1812 or 202-692-1812
Fax: 202-692-1801
Email: mastersinternational@peacecorps.gov

Sample Timeline for MSPH/PCMI Students

Fall 2014 - First Term - Begin MSPH coursework at JHSPH (16 units)
Fall 2014 - Second Term - Continue MSPH coursework at JHSPH (16 units)
Spring 2015 -Third Term - Continue MSPH coursework at JHSPH (16 units)
Spring 2015 - Fourth Term - Complete MSPH coursework at JHSPH (16 units)
Summer 2015 - Begin Volunteer project orientation
Fall 2015 - Begin Volunteer Service (32 units)
Fall 2016 - Completion of Peace Corps Volunteer Service and Awarding of MSPH/PCMI degree

Application Process

Students interested in applying to the MSPH/PCMI program within the Department of Population, Family and Reproductive Health should apply first to the MSPH program at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. After admission to the MSPH program, but before matriculation, students apply to the Peace Corps, indicating that they are in the Hopkins MSPH/PCMI program. Peace Corps acceptance, medical and legal clearance can take up to one year to complete, so it is best to get started early.

Please note that Peace Corps requires U.S. citizenship to serve as a Volunteer.

It should be noted that this is NOT a Peace Corps Fellows program. The Fellows Program is for returned Peace Corps Volunteers who then enter a graduate school program. Our JHU School of Nursing has a Peace Corps Fellows Program.

In addition, the Shriver Peaceworker Program at the University of Maryland is a Fellows Program with significant scholarship support. A student may combine study here at JHSPH with community service to participate in the Shriver Peaceworker Program. For more information about the Shriver Peaceworker Program, please visit the Shriver Center's website.

For more information on the Department of Population, Family and Reproductive Health’s MSPH/PCMI program, please contact Jamie Haines jhaines@jhu.edu or 410-955-1116.