Skip Navigation

The Summer Institute in Tropical Medicine and Public Health

June 15 - July 24, 2015

Curriculum

Courses are designed to give an overview of select issues in tropical medicine. Specific tropical diseases and case studies stressing diagnosis will be highlighted. Emphasis will be on the control and prevention of tropical diseases and basic pathogenic mechanisms of selected infectious diseases that continue to be of major public health importance. Students will be introduced to both clinical and environmental aspects of public health and disease control, and will acquire a working knowledge of the biology of these diseases, including prospects for effective management and control at both the personal and public health level. Courses include laboratory sessions and practical lab experience, and will help prepare students working with current and emerging health problems in developing countries. Specific areas of focus for each course are listed below.

Faculty and guest lecturers conduct all five modules.

Module I:

HIV, Tuberculosis, and Other Chronic Infections in the Tropics
June 15 – June 19, 2014  
8:30 a.m. - 5:30 p.m.
Robert Gilman, MD, DTMH and Carlton Evans, FRCP, PhD, DTMH   
4 Academic Credits

Description:

Course will cover the history, clinical presentation, epidemiological factors, new diagnostic techniques, treatment, and control of tuberculosis. Addresses pathophysiology, clinical presentation, ecology, and effects of HIV/AIDS on developing countries, their populations, and resource utilization. Additional topics include other chronic infections that have global public health importance. There will be an emphasis on integrating policies addressing TB, HIV/AIDS, other infections and poverty in resource-poor settings and how these interactions influence control strategies.

Student Evaluation:

Class participation, midterm exam and final exam.

Learning Objectives:

By the end of the course, students should able to: 1) describe the epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment of TB, HIV and the major chronic tropical infections; 2) characterize preventive and control policies for these diseases in the tropics; 3) understand how integrating public health and development policies can strengthen control of these chronic infections in resource-poor settings.

Return to top >>

Module II:

Vector-Borne Diseases in the Tropics
June 22 - June 26, 2015
8:30 a.m. - 5:30 p.m.
David Sullivan, MD and Robert Gilman, MD, DTMH
4 Academic Credits

Description:

Focuses on vector-borne diseases prominent in tropical infections. Areas of emphasis are global epidemiology, diagnosis, clinical presentations, pathophysiology, and treatment of microorganisms as well as characterization and control of vectors. Laboratory sessions integrate clinical cases and pathology. Principal diseases covered include malaria, African and American trypansomiasis, leishmaniasis, filariasis, yellow fever, dengue, hemorrhagic fevers, Bartonella, Lyme, Rickettsial, plague and toxoplasmosis.

Student Evaluation:

Class participation, midterm exam and final exam.

Learning Objectives:

Upon completion of this course, students should be able to: Understand the biology, global distribution and impact, infectious source, transmission, diagnosis, mechanism of pathology in relationship to infectious agent or host immune response, treatment and control of vector borne diseases relevant to the tropics; Characterize vectors and methods of control relevant to disease control.

Return to top >>

Module III:

Intestinal Infections in the Tropics
July 6 - July 11, 2015
8:30 am - 5:30 pm                                                   
Robert Gilman, MD, DTMH   
4 Academic Credits

Description:

Provides an overview of the epidemiology, presentation, and effects of microbial, protozoan, and viral intestinal infections, including Salmonella, Shigella, cholera, typhoid, rotavirus, amebiasis, dysentery, H. pylori, Campylobacter, Cryptopsoridium, Cyclospora, and Giardia. Clinical presentation, life cycle, distribution, prevention, and treatment of intestinal helminthes, including Ascaris, Trichuris, Strongyloides, and hookworm are addressed. Interactions between parasites, diarrhea, and malnutrition, are addressed, along with treatment, prevention and control strategies, and oral rehydration therapy. Cysticercosis and hydatid disease are also be covered. Includes laboratory sessions and practical lab experience.

Student Evaluation:

Class participation, midterm exam and final exam.

Learning Objectives:

At the end of the course, students should be able to: 1) understand the epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment of several major tropical intestinal diseases; 2) list public health preventive and control measures for the major intestinal diseases in the tropics; 3) recognize important protozoal and worm pathogens as presented in laboratory specimens.

Return to top >>

Module IV:

Child and Public Health In the Tropics
July 13 - July 17, 2015  
8:30 a.m. - 5:30 p.m.
William Moss, MD, MPH and Robert Gilman, MD, DTMH    
4 Academic Credits

Description:

Introduces students to the major global causes of child mortality and the strategies and interventions to reduce child mortality. Specific topics include malaria, HIV, measles, pneumonia, diarrhea, neonatal disorders and nutritional deficiencies. Additional topics may include maternal mortality, eye diseases, demography and anthropometry. A specific focus, and a theme emphasized through the different lectures, is the tension and balance between horizontal approaches to child survival, such as Integrated Management of Childhood Illness (IMCI), and vertical programs such as disease eradication programs. Students discuss several papers published as part of the Lancet Child Survival and Lancet Neonatal Survival series, and gain hands-on experience applying different child survival strategies using the Lives Saved Tool (LiST).

Student Evaluation:

Class participation, midterm exam and final exam.

Learning Objectives:

At the end of the course, students should be able to: 1) list the major global causes of child mortality; 2) describe interventions to reduce mortality from each of the major causes; 3) explain the role of undernutrition and micronutrient deficiencies in child morbidity and mortality; 4) describe advantages and disadvantages of horizontal and vertical child survival programs; and 5) list major challenges to reducing global child mortality.

Return to top >>

Module V:

Chronic Diseases in Low- and Middle-Income Countries
July 20 - 24, 2015
9 a.m. - 5 p.m.
Course Instructors:
William Checkley, MD,PhD and Robert Gilman, MD, DTMH
4 Academic Credits

Description
Course designed to introduce students to the major chronic diseases in low- and middle-income countries like COPD, asthma, cardiovascular disease, ischemic heart disease, hypertension, and diabetes among others. Lectures will detail specific chronic diseases, stressing such areas as significance, prevention, diagnosis, management and implementation of control measures. Sessions will include both traditional lectures and case studies. 

This course is aimed at students who are interested in working in research programs and international organizations and who seek to have a basic foundation of the epidemiology and challenges in the management of chronic diseases in low- and middle-income countries. 

Student Evaluation
Class and case studies participation, course evaluation and daily exams.

Learning Objectives
Upon completion of this course, students should be able to describe the epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis and management of major chronic diseases in low- and middle-income countries; characterize preventive and control policies for chronic diseases in low- and middle-income countries; and, understand the epidemiological transition from infectious diseases to chronic diseases in low- and middle-income countries.

Return to top >>