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Course Catalog

340.601.81 PRINCIPLES OF EPIDEMIOLOGY

Department:
Epidemiology
Term:
3rd term
Credits:
5 credits
Academic Year:
2014 - 2015
Location:
Internet
Auditors Allowed:
Yes, with instructor consent
Grading Restriction:
Letter Grade or Pass/Fail
Contact:
Jennifer Deal
Course Instructors:

Visit the CoursePlus site for this course

Prerequisite:

Introduction to Online Learning https://courseplus.jhsph.edu/core/index.cfm/go/course.home/cid/90/

Description:

Introduces principles and methods of epidemiologic investigation of infectious and noninfectious diseases. Illustrates methods by which studies of the distribution and dynamic behavior of disease in a population can contribute to an understanding of etiologic factors, modes of transmission, and pathogenesis. Presents different types of study design, including randomized trials, case-control and cohort studies, risk estimation and causal inferences. Demonstrates the relationship between epidemiology and the development of policy. Laboratory problems provide experience in epidemiologic methods and inferences, illustrating a common-vehicle epidemic; the spread of infectious disease in school, home, and community; epidemiological aspects of a noninfectious disease; vaccination; the epidemiological approach to health services evaluation; rates of morbidity and mortality; sensitivity and specificity; and life table methods. No auditors permitted.

Learning Objectives:

Upon successfully completing this course, students will be able to:

  1. Describe basic epidemiologic methods and study design
  2. Critically review published epidemiologic papers and assess the validity of their design and their inferences
  3. Explain the role of epidemiologic methods in uncovering the etiology of disease and other health states in order to prevent disease and improve health
  4. Identify the place of epidemiology in outbreak investigation and surveillance
  5. Explain how epidemiologic methods are used in evaluating screening programs and health interventions, and in the development of health policy
Methods of Assessment:

Homework Assignments 20%; Activity Assignments 35%; Mid-term Examination 20%; Final Examination 25%

Instructor Consent:

No consent required