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Delta Omega

History

By Gerard J. Shorb, Johns Hopkins University

Appendix A: Brief Biographical Sketches of the Charter Members of Alpha Chapter

Charles A. Bailey received his medical degree from the Long Island College Hospital in 1899 and his Certificate in Public Health from The Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health in 1924. He worked first as a Field Director in Mexico and later became Senior State Director in Paris for the International Health Board of the Rockefeller Foundation.54

Milford E. Barnes was from Columbus Junction, Iowa. He received undergraduate degrees from Monmouth College and the University of Chicago and his medical degree from Rush Medical College. He was a graduate of the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine at the University of London and he received his doctorate in Public Health from The Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health in 1925. For several years he served as the Director for Siam for the International Health Division of the Rockefeller Foundation. He also became the Director of the Ohio Training Station for Health Officers in the late 1920s. Finally, he held the appointment of Professor of Hygiene and Preventive Medicine at the University of Iowa.55

Yves M. Biraud received his undergraduate degree and a Masters of Science from the University of Poitiers, France. He received his medical degree from the University of Paris in 1923 and his Certificate in Public Health from The Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health in 1924. He became Head of the Statistical Department, Institut d'Hygiene Faculte de Medecine in Paris, France. He worked for the Epidemiological Intelligence Service of the League of Nations and later became the Director for Epidemiological Services and Health Statistics of the World Health Organization.56

James B. Black received his medical degree from Tulane University in 1918 and his Certificate in Public Health from The Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health in 1924. He also received his Doctorate in Public Health in 1929 from Hopkins. Doctor Black became the Director of Public Health in Lee County Mississippi.57

John W. Brown earned his medical degree from Vanderbilt University in 1910 and his Certificate in Public Health from The Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health in 1924. He was a City Health Officer in El Paso, Texas and later Director of Public Health in Houston.58

W. Thurber Fales was born in Milford Massachusetts. He received a bachelor's degree from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1917 and a Certificate in Public Health from Harvard University in 1920. Fales was an Instructor of Epidemiology at The Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health from 1920 to 1924. He received his Doctor of Science degree (Sc.D.) in Epidemiology from Hopkins in 1924. Fales was State Registrar and Director of the Bureau of Vital Statistics for the State Board of Health in Alabama from 1924 to 1934. He became the Director of the Bureau of Vital Statistics at the Baltimore City Health Department from 1934 to 1953.59

Martin Frobisher Jr. got his Bachelor's degree and his Doctorate in Science from Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health. He was an Instructor of Bacteriology at the Hopkins' School of Medicine from 1925 to 1928. A Special Member of the International Health Division of the Rockefeller Foundation in Brazil from 1928 to 1932, Frobisher later (1932 to 1946) became Associate Professor of Bacteriology at the Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health. After that, he was the Chief Bacteriologist at the Center for Disease Control, a position he held for four years. From 1949 to 1952 he was an Associate Professor at Emory University. His last major appointment was as Professor of Bacteriology at the University of Georgia.60

Raymond D. Fear received his bachelor's degree from Hamilton College in 1913. He took his medical degree from The Johns Hopkins University in 1917 and his Doctorate in Public Health from The Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health in 1924. He was the Health Commissioner for Stamford, Connecticut.61

John F. Kendrick took his B.S. degree at the University of North Carolina in 1912 and his M.D. from the Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University in Philadelphia in 1914. He graduated from The Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health in 1924. He worked for the International Health Board of the Rockefeller Foundation as a Field Director.62

Shelton S. King got his M.D.C.M. from McGill University in Montreal in 1905 and received his Doctorate in Public Health from The Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health in 1924. He worked for the International Health Board of the Rockefeller Foundation and for the Child Welfare Department in Westchester County, New York.63

Edward A. Lane received his bachelor's degree from Williams College in 1912 and his medical degree from Cornell University in 1916. He also earned degrees in public health from The Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health (C.P.H. 1924) and Harvard (M.P.H. 1931). He worked for the State Department of Health in Nashville, Tennessee. Later, he was Director of the Division of Communicable Diseases in Westchester County, New York.64

Hilario Lara earned his medical degree in the Philippine Islands in 1919 and received a Doctorate in Public Health in 1924 from The Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health. He later became Dean of the Institute of Hygiene, University of the Philippines. He was also Professor of Hygiene and Preventive Medicine at the same institution.65

Hynek J. Pelc took his medical degree at the Medical Faculty in Prague. He earned his Doctorate in Public Health at The Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health in 1924. He was the Assistant Director of the Prague Institute of Hygiene in Czechoslovakia. He also held the position of Professor of Social Medicine at Charles University in Prague.66 Doctor Pelc was executed by the Nazis in 1942.

Persis Putnam received her B.A. degree at Smith College in 1911. She earned her Doctor of Science degree from The Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health in 1926. She was the main statistical analyst for the International Health Division of the Rockefeller Foundation.67

George H. Ramsey received his medical degree from Columbia University in 1917 and his Doctorate in Public Health from The Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health in 1926. He was Deputy Commissioner of the State Department of Health in Michigan from 1921 to 1926. Ramsey was also an Associate Professor of Epidemiology from 1926 to 1933 at Johns Hopkins. He later became Assistant Commissioner of Preventable Diseases in the New York State Health Department from 1933 to 1938. He was also Health Commissioner of Westchester County in New York 1938 to 1942.68

James Angus Doull, Delta Omega's first alumnus member was born in 1889. He earned a B.A. degree in 1911 and his M.D. in 1914. Taking his Diploma in Public Health from Cambridge University, England in 1919 and his Doctorate in Public Health from The Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health in 1921, Doull was Associate Professor of Epidemiology at Hopkins from 1924 to 1930. From 1930 to 1945 he was Professor of Hygiene and Public Health at Case Western Reserve University. He served in the Medical Corps of the United States Public Health Service, retiring as Medical Director in 1953.69 He was instrumental in developing the first scientific method for determining the effectiveness of chemotherapy in treating leprosy. He is also remembered for his work with the Leonard Wood Memorial Foundation for the Eradication of Leprosy.70

William Henry Welch, the first Delta Omega faculty member, was the first Director of The Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health. He was also the first Professor of Pathology at The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and later became the first medical school Dean. Welch was also the first Professor of the History of Medicine and Director of the Institute of the History of Medicine at The Johns Hopkins University.