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Keyword: what you're asking

piles of filesLast month, I kept a tally of questions directed to admiss@jhsph.edu and wrote a post addressing the top five. It was a popular post and I hope that means it was helpful, especially because I plan to make it a monthly thing.

Five was a few too many, so I will address the three most asked questions of the past week.

1.  Have you received my materials?

Just as it was last month, this was by far the most asked question.

If your application is submitted, the easiest way for you to check your materials is to log back into your online application

If you JUST submitted, it may take up to ten days for us to match your materials to the online record.  We appreciate your patience.

If you have not yet submitted your application, your materials will be placed in a holding file. Remember, we don’t process supporting documents until your application is submitted and the application fee paid. This is yet another reason to submit early. If you wait until the last minute, there may not be time to resolve any potential issues.

For more information, see “Welcoming the Flood” and “Our Process – Part 2: What Happens When I Click Submit?”

2.  When will a decision be made on my application?

It typically takes eight to ten weeks for the admissions review committees  to reach an admissions decision. 

If you have any questions or need a more specific timeframe, you should contact your program directly.

For more information, see “Waiting” and “Our Process-Part 3: Under Review.”

3.  My application says I need to submit final transcripts. What does that mean?

Generally, this notation appears in the applications of those currently completing coursework or a degree. Your school likely sent us an “in progress” transcript, showing your coursework to date.

While your “in progress” transcript is usually sufficient for our admissions review, it will not fulfill the University’s final transcript requirement.  If you are admitted and before you begin classes at the School of Public Health, you will need to provide an official final transcript showing your newly completed courses and grades you earned. Admitted students who do not provide final documentation may not be able to register for classes or receive federal funding.

See the Admitted Student website or contact admissions if you have any questions.

Best wishes to you!
 

Woman with computerYou've had a lot of questions! We spent quite a bit of last week answering email inquiries and I kept a tally of the questions asked.

Below are the top five questions from the first week of the new year.  I’ll answer them briefly now, provide links to additional information, and address each one in detail later this month.

  1. Have you received my transcripts/test scores/letter of recommendations?

We’re happy to check, but if your application is submitted, you can monitor its status by logging into your online application.

Also see “Welcoming the Flood” and “Our Process – Part 2: What Happens When I Click Submit?”

  1. Will you waive my TOEFL/IELTS scores?

Admissions will waive the English language proficiency test score required of international applicants if:

1) you completed a four-year degree from an accredited U.S. institution

2) you’re from a country listed on the quick reference list.

  1. Attached (to my email) are my transcripts/test scores/letter of recommendations.  Please add them to them my application.

Emailed attachments are considered unofficial. Many of our programs will not review an application unless the supporting materials are official.

  1. Can I add a fourth recommendation provider?

Absolutely! Admissions staff can add them on the administrative end.

After entering your first three providers, email admissions your fourth provider’s name, contact information, whether you will be waiving the right to view the letter, and whether the provider will be submitting on or offline.

  1. I attended a school outside the U.S.  Do I really need to submit a credentials evaluation? Can’t you just review my official transcript?

Regardless of your citizenship, language or home country, if you attended a post-secondary institution physically located outside the United States, you must have your academic records evaluated by an NACES-approved credential evaluation agency.

An official transcript from an international institution will not suffice.

I hope this helps!