Skip Navigation

Admissions

Admissions Blog

Keyword: what you're asking

Question Mark - What You're AskingIn this (mostly) monthly series, I scope out emails sent to jhsph.admiss@jhu.edu and tally the most frequently asked questions. I then answer the most popular questions here on the blog.

The most common questions this month were very similar to those from last month. Because so many are still asking, the first question below is a repeat.

When will I learn my admissions decision?

The length of an admissions review varies based on your department, your program, the number of applications received, the time of year submitted, etc. Each of our academic departments and the MPH program office have their own admissions review committee (sometimes more than one). These committees meet at different times and with varying levels of frequency. 

It typically takes eight to ten weeks for a committee to reach an admissions decision, but in a few cases, it can take longer. 

Why don’t I see my program of interest as a choice in the application?

First, make sure you’re using the correct application. Our School uses two and it’s dependent on your program.

Second, check the application deadline. If you don’t see your program of interest as an option and the deadline has passed, it’s likely that your program is no longer accepting applications.

Applications for the 2016-2017 Academic Year will open September 2015.

More Questions?

Please feel free to contact us at jhsph.admiss@jhu.edu.

And don’t forget to take our survey regarding the Academic Prospectus!

QuestionIt’s the first “What You’re Asking” of 2015!

In this (mostly) monthly series, I scope out emails sent to jhsph.admiss@jhu.edu and tally the most frequently asked questions. I then answer the most popular questions here on the blog.

Here are this month’s questions.

Have you received my test scores/transcripts/credentials evaluation?

In most cases, you can see whether we received your materials by logging back into your online application. I blogged about this last month in a post titled “Material Status.”

When will I learn if I’m granted admission?

The length of an admissions review varies based on your department, your program, the number of applications received, the time of year submitted, etc. Each of our academic departments and the MPH program office have their own admissions review committees. These committees meet at different times and with varying levels of frequency. 

It typically takes eight to ten weeks for a committee to reach an admissions decision, but in a few cases, it can take longer. 

Prospectus surveyHow can I let you know what I thought of the Academic Prospectus?

Funny you should ask!

In case you didn’t see my post last week, here is another plea.

Please help us better inform future prospective students. Let us know your thoughts on the Academic Prospectus.

We appreciate your feedback!

As always, best wishes to you and your application!

QuestionsIt’s the final “What You’re Asking” of 2014!

In this (mostly) monthly series, I scope out emails sent to jhsph.admiss@jhu.edu and tally the most frequently asked questions. I then answer the most popular questions here on the blog.

This month’s questions are:

I completed my undergraduate degree in [choose a country outside the U.S.]. Do I need to submit those transcripts and if so, do they need to be evaluated?

Yes and yes.

The Bloomberg School requires official academic records, transcripts, or mark sheets from all colleges, universities, graduate, or professional schools attended. That includes the records from your undergraduate institution, even if you didn’t finish your degree.

In addition, regardless of your citizenship, language or home country, if you attended a college or university outside of the United States, you must have your academic records evaluated by an external U.S.-based credentials evaluation agency.

There are some exceptions for study abroad and English-speaking Canada, but you should carefully review our international applicant page for details in fulfilling this requirement.

I submitted my application, but my test scores may be late. Is that going to be a problem?

Your online application and supporting materials (official transcripts, test scores, letters of recommendation, etc.) must be submitted by the application deadline.  

Some of our programs (NOT ALL) are willing to review applications completed soon after the deadline.  However, once the deadline has passed, Admissions Services can no longer guarantee an admissions review.  Submitting materials after the deadline may also hurt your chances of funding through your program. 

You should contact your department of interest to discuss how any late materials might affect your application.

Lastly, remember: application deadlines vary. Know your program, its application, requirements and deadline.

Best wishes to you and your application!

question markWe’re overdue for a new installment in our blog series, “What You’re Asking!”

Let me remind you how the series works. Each month, I scope out emails sent to jhsph.admiss@jhu.edu and tally the most frequently asked questions. I then answer a couple of the most popular questions here on this blog.

This month, instead of pulling the most asked questions from our email account, I’m going to answer here the top questions asked at the SOPHAS Virtual Fair last week.

Could you answer my question regarding curriculum/student profile/research opportunities for the MHS in Epidemiology/MSPH in International Health/PhD in Mental Health/Schoolwide MPH/my specific program of interest?

As you may know – or guess from the sample question above – the Bloomberg School offers a number of public health degrees. Nine, to be exact. And while we in admissions pride ourselves with our Bloomberg School knowledge, it just isn’t possible to know everything.

For that reason, once you’ve narrowed your interests to a program or two, we encourage you to contact the appropriate academic coordinator. These individuals can help answer specific questions as well as connect prospective students with faculty, current students and other program specific resources. Each department has at least one coordinator and their contact information is typically listed on the department’s website or you may email us for help.

Can I have my TOEFL scores waived?

Admission Services will only waive the English language proficiency test requirement (TOEFL or IELTS) if a student has completed a four-year degree from an accredited U.S. institution OR if a student is from a country listed on our quick reference list.

It’s possible your program of interest would be willing to waive the English language proficiency test, but there are no guarantees. You’re welcome to contact them directly to inquire further.

Please let us know if you need help locating a contact.

Is experience required for your degree programs?

While public health experience can almost always help an application, only a few of our programs absolutely require it.

For example, our Schoolwide Master of Public Health requires two years of post-baccalaureate, full-time, health-related work experience of all applicants who have not earned a public health related doctoral degree.

The Bloomberg School offers five other public health master’s degrees. For the most part, these departmental degrees (the MHA, MHS, MPP, MSPH, and ScM) do not require work experience. They offer an alternative for students desiring more focused skills and/or for less experienced students.

questionIt’s time for another edition in our monthly series: “What You’re Asking.”

Here’s how it works: I scope out emails sent to jhsph.admiss@jhu.edu and tally the most frequently asked questions. I then answer a couple of the most popular questions here on this blog.

Ready? Here we go!

I’m really interested in your PhD program in epidemiology/biostatistics/health policy/human nutrition/etc. How can I learn more?

Once you’ve identified a program of interest, there are a number of resources at your disposal.

  • Visit the department’s website
    Each of our ten academic departments offer the PhD and all have robust websites. Most provide detailed information on research areas, program goals, course requirements, and even potential funding resources.
  • Contact your department’s academic coordinator
    Academic coordinators know their department inside out. They’re able to answer many of your detailed program questions as well as connect you with additional resources within their program. The contact information for academic coordinators is typically listed on the website or you can email jhsph.admiss@jhu.edu for help.
  • Browse the department’s faculty
    You may search our faculty directory by name, department or keyword. You’re not required to have a faculty mentor in place at the time of application, but it’s always a good idea to make sure there are folks in your department whose research interests match yours.
  • Connect with current students
    Through the appropriate academic coordinator or the student websites, connect with fellow students or alumni. Your peers are a great resource – before, during and after your Hopkins experience.

When is the application deadline for the program in epidemiology/biostatistics/health policy/human nutrition/etc.?

We have a number of application deadlines and they vary by department, degree and sometimes by degree track. We will be posting the deadline chart for applications to the 2015-2016 academic year August 1 (the day after tomorrow!).