Skip Navigation

Admissions

Admissions Blog

Keyword: what you're asking

question markWe’re overdue for a new installment in our blog series, “What You’re Asking!”

Let me remind you how the series works. Each month, I scope out emails sent to jhsph.admiss@jhu.edu and tally the most frequently asked questions. I then answer a couple of the most popular questions here on this blog.

This month, instead of pulling the most asked questions from our email account, I’m going to answer here the top questions asked at the SOPHAS Virtual Fair last week.

Could you answer my question regarding curriculum/student profile/research opportunities for the MHS in Epidemiology/MSPH in International Health/PhD in Mental Health/Schoolwide MPH/my specific program of interest?

As you may know – or guess from the sample question above – the Bloomberg School offers a number of public health degrees. Nine, to be exact. And while we in admissions pride ourselves with our Bloomberg School knowledge, it just isn’t possible to know everything.

For that reason, once you’ve narrowed your interests to a program or two, we encourage you to contact the appropriate academic coordinator. These individuals can help answer specific questions as well as connect prospective students with faculty, current students and other program specific resources. Each department has at least one coordinator and their contact information is typically listed on the department’s website or you may email us for help.

Can I have my TOEFL scores waived?

Admission Services will only waive the English language proficiency test requirement (TOEFL or IELTS) if a student has completed a four-year degree from an accredited U.S. institution OR if a student is from a country listed on our quick reference list.

It’s possible your program of interest would be willing to waive the English language proficiency test, but there are no guarantees. You’re welcome to contact them directly to inquire further.

Please let us know if you need help locating a contact.

Is experience required for your degree programs?

While public health experience can almost always help an application, only a few of our programs absolutely require it.

For example, our Schoolwide Master of Public Health requires two years of post-baccalaureate, full-time, health-related work experience of all applicants who have not earned a public health related doctoral degree.

The Bloomberg School offers five other public health master’s degrees. For the most part, these departmental degrees (the MHA, MHS, MPP, MSPH, and ScM) do not require work experience. They offer an alternative for students desiring more focused skills and/or for less experienced students.

questionIt’s time for another edition in our monthly series: “What You’re Asking.”

Here’s how it works: I scope out emails sent to jhsph.admiss@jhu.edu and tally the most frequently asked questions. I then answer a couple of the most popular questions here on this blog.

Ready? Here we go!

I’m really interested in your PhD program in epidemiology/biostatistics/health policy/human nutrition/etc. How can I learn more?

Once you’ve identified a program of interest, there are a number of resources at your disposal.

  • Visit the department’s website
    Each of our ten academic departments offer the PhD and all have robust websites. Most provide detailed information on research areas, program goals, course requirements, and even potential funding resources.
  • Contact your department’s academic coordinator
    Academic coordinators know their department inside out. They’re able to answer many of your detailed program questions as well as connect you with additional resources within their program. The contact information for academic coordinators is typically listed on the website or you can email jhsph.admiss@jhu.edu for help.
  • Browse the department’s faculty
    You may search our faculty directory by name, department or keyword. You’re not required to have a faculty mentor in place at the time of application, but it’s always a good idea to make sure there are folks in your department whose research interests match yours.
  • Connect with current students
    Through the appropriate academic coordinator or the student websites, connect with fellow students or alumni. Your peers are a great resource – before, during and after your Hopkins experience.

When is the application deadline for the program in epidemiology/biostatistics/health policy/human nutrition/etc.?

We have a number of application deadlines and they vary by department, degree and sometimes by degree track. We will be posting the deadline chart for applications to the 2015-2016 academic year August 1 (the day after tomorrow!).

Question markIt’s time for another edition in our monthly series: “What You’re Asking.”

Here’s how it works: I scope out emails sent to jhsph.admiss@jhu.edu and tally the most frequently asked questions. I then answer a couple of the most popular questions here.

This month’s tally revealed that we have come full circle in the application process. We in admissions are preparing to welcome new students to orientation, but many of you are just beginning this process. You’re asking:

I’ve recently discovered the field of public health and want to learn more, where do I start?

Right here!

I’ve done my best to share as many resources as I can on this blog, but there are many more. Here are a few to get you started

What degrees do you offer?

The Bloomberg School offers nine public health graduate degrees. These degrees include our Schoolwide Master of Public Health (MPH) as well as a plethora of degrees offered by ten academic departments!   

With so many degrees and opportunities, the resulting alphabet soup can be confusing. So, make use of the resources above, thoroughly review our website, narrow your interests and then contact the academic coordinator for the program that truly calls to you. 

If you have trouble locating a contact or have a question, we’re here to help!

Best wishes to you on your public health journey!

question markIt’s time for another edition in our monthly series: “What You’re Asking.”

For you new readers, here’s how it works:
I scope out emails sent to jhsph.admiss@jhu.edu and tally the most frequently asked questions. I answer a couple of the most popular questions here.

In this month’s tally, there were no stand-out questions. It's a strange time of year when we’re fielding a wide variety of questions from individuals just beginning to consider a graduate program in public health, current applicants, and newly admitted students.

I’ve picked the most popular question from each of these groups for this month’s post.                                                                                                    

I’m considering a graduate degree in public health and want to know more about your MPH.

Our Master of Public Health (MPH) is a Schoolwide degree. It approaches public health from a multidisciplinary prospective and students have the option of customizing the program to fit their interests and goals. Our MPH is offered in both full- and part-time formats.

It’s important to note, the Bloomberg School MPH is geared toward individuals already working in the field and does require two years of post-baccalaureate, health-related, full-time work experience.

If you do not have this experience, do not despair! The MPH is one of nine public health degrees offered at the School. There are five other master’s degrees which do not require work experience. These degrees are geared toward less experienced individuals, those making a career change or students seeking a more focused program.

Which program is right for you? That a question only you can answer. We strongly encourage you to do your research, examine each program’s requirements, curriculum and faculty. Your degree should provide you with the tools to reach your public health goals.

I’m working on an application to one of your master’s programs with a summer deadline. How do I know if you received my transcripts?

Each year, we receive over 3,000 formally submitted applications (plus the accompanying transcripts, letters of recommendation and test scores). Many more applications remain unsubmitted and are never finished. Because of this volume, we do not process materials for unsubmitted applications or for those applications with unpaid application fees.

Materials that arrive before the application is submitted are date stamped and placed in a holding file.

Once the application is submitted and application fee paid, we create an official application file, begin processing supporting materials, and enter those materials into the online record.

A few days after you’ve submitted, log back into your online application and you will see we’ve been hard at work.

One note: matching supporting materials to the online application is a manual process.  It can take up to ten business days - especially if you submitted on or near a major application deadline – for your supporting materials to appear as received in your online file.

I’m a newly admitted student and would like information regarding my enrollment deposit/deferrals/housing/transportation?

It sounds like you need to visit the Admitted Student Website! The site has a login and password (contact us if you need this information) and provides all of the above information and more!

Any other questions?

Feel free to call, leave a comment below or email us.

Question MarkWe’re a month overdue for an edition in our series: “What You’re Asking.” Let me rectify that right now.

Once again, here’s how it works:
I scope out emails sent to jhsph.admiss@jhu.edu and tally the most frequently asked questions. I answer a couple of the most popular questions here.

1.  I have an advanced degree. Am I still required to submit GRE scores as part of my application?

In general, all applicants are required to submit standardized test scores as part of their application. All of our programs will accept the GRE. Some (not all) will accept other test scores, such as those from the GMAT, MCAT or LSAT. See our application requirements chart to learn which scores are appropriate for your program of interest.

Our Schoolwide MPH is the only of our many public health degree programs to waive the standardized test score for those individuals having earned an advanced degree beyond the baccalaureate. However, in doing so, these applicants put themselves at a significant disadvantage if the rest of their admissions materials do not clearly demonstrate their quantitative and analytical skills. This is especially true for applicants with medical degrees earned outside of the United States. Additionally, applicants who request to have their applications reviewed without standardized test scores will likely not be awarded a scholarship.

The process for submitting test scores can vary depending on your program. Please read our application instructions carefully. MPH applicants should pay special attention to the instructions specific to them.

2.  I’m a prospective student and would like to talk to a current student with my same interests. Can you connect me?

There are a number of ways for prospective students to connect with current students.

The first is through our Student Webpages.  You’ll notice there are two tabs: "Ambassadors" and "All Students." You may contact any of the students through the website, but “ Ambassadors” have volunteered to be a special help to new and prospective students.

If you have a specific program of interest, you might also contact the appropriate academic coordinator. These individuals may be found with the administrative contacts for each department. Academic coordinators are the best resource regarding a specific program's curriculum, faculty and current students. Contact us if you need help locating the appropriate coordinator.

If you’re an admitted student, you might also attend one of our virtual student panels or Visitors Day. Information on these events may be found on our Admitted Student Website (login and password required – contact us if you need assistance).

I hope this helps!  As always, if you have any additional questions, please feel free to email us at jhsph.admiss@jhu.edu.