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Keyword: events

This has been graduation week at Johns Hopkins University. Yesterday was the university-wide commencement ceremony, but each of the schools have their own award and convocation ceremonies.

We celebrated graduates from the School of Public Health on Tuesday. Here are a few highlights captured by yours truly.

Convocation photos

Congratulations again to the Class of 2014!

Today is one of the happiest days of the year – it’s Convocation day!

Congratulations to the Class of 2014!

graduation

eposterThroughout our School we have electronic posters with scrolling lists of events and headlines.

I point them out during campus tours as proof of the following claim: there is always something going on at the Bloomberg School.

Thesis defense seminars, special lectures, brown bag lunches, journal club meetings – the list goes on and on.

Some events are bigger than others.

Yesterday was an example of a big event.

There was a town hall discussing the issues surrounding prescription drug abuse. President Bill Clinton opened the event.

Yes, you read that right. President Clinton was here.

I won’t lie. I was a little star struck.

You can read all about it (President Clinton’s visit and the compelling panel that followed – not me being star struck) in today’s web story. A video of the town hall will be posted soon.

It’s the fourth day of National Public Health Week (NPHW) and today’s theme is “Be the Healthiest Nation in One Generation.”

A few years ago, APHA put together a video that perfectly explains today’s theme. Some of the statistics are a few years old, but the message is still very relevant.

 

Apple in handsIt’s the fourth day of National Public Health Week (NPHW) and today’s theme is “Eat Well.”

Public health issues surrounding food include not only what we eat, but where we get it and how it’s produced.

These questions are so important, the Johns Hopkins Public Health magazine devoted this year’s special spring issue to food. In the web edition, you can read about bringing healthy food to urban food deserts, the problems of industrial farming, researchers trying to avoid future famines and more.

It’s great lunchtime reading. Feel free to browse while you eat your salad!