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Admissions Blog

Date: Apr 2014

Lab workerAre you an employee of the US Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) or one of its organizations?

Did you know the Bloomberg School partners with HHS University to provide tuition discounts for select certificates, for-credit courses and the online/part-time MPH?

Visit our website for information about eligibility and how to apply. Email us with questions or meet us at an upcoming fair for HHS employees. These fairs and other opportunities to meet with Bloomberg School admissions representatives may be found on our recruiting calendar.

Hope to see you soon!

question markIt’s time for another edition in our monthly series: “What You’re Asking.”

For you new readers, here’s how it works:
I scope out emails sent to jhsph.admiss@jhu.edu and tally the most frequently asked questions. I answer a couple of the most popular questions here.

In this month’s tally, there were no stand-out questions. It's a strange time of year when we’re fielding a wide variety of questions from individuals just beginning to consider a graduate program in public health, current applicants, and newly admitted students.

I’ve picked the most popular question from each of these groups for this month’s post.                                                                                                    

I’m considering a graduate degree in public health and want to know more about your MPH.

Our Master of Public Health (MPH) is a Schoolwide degree. It approaches public health from a multidisciplinary prospective and students have the option of customizing the program to fit their interests and goals. Our MPH is offered in both full- and part-time formats.

It’s important to note, the Bloomberg School MPH is geared toward individuals already working in the field and does require two years of post-baccalaureate, health-related, full-time work experience.

If you do not have this experience, do not despair! The MPH is one of nine public health degrees offered at the School. There are five other master’s degrees which do not require work experience. These degrees are geared toward less experienced individuals, those making a career change or students seeking a more focused program.

Which program is right for you? That a question only you can answer. We strongly encourage you to do your research, examine each program’s requirements, curriculum and faculty. Your degree should provide you with the tools to reach your public health goals.

I’m working on an application to one of your master’s programs with a summer deadline. How do I know if you received my transcripts?

Each year, we receive over 3,000 formally submitted applications (plus the accompanying transcripts, letters of recommendation and test scores). Many more applications remain unsubmitted and are never finished. Because of this volume, we do not process materials for unsubmitted applications or for those applications with unpaid application fees.

Materials that arrive before the application is submitted are date stamped and placed in a holding file.

Once the application is submitted and application fee paid, we create an official application file, begin processing supporting materials, and enter those materials into the online record.

A few days after you’ve submitted, log back into your online application and you will see we’ve been hard at work.

One note: matching supporting materials to the online application is a manual process.  It can take up to ten business days - especially if you submitted on or near a major application deadline – for your supporting materials to appear as received in your online file.

I’m a newly admitted student and would like information regarding my enrollment deposit/deferrals/housing/transportation?

It sounds like you need to visit the Admitted Student Website! The site has a login and password (contact us if you need this information) and provides all of the above information and more!

Any other questions?

Feel free to call, leave a comment below or email us.

BroomI’m doing a little spring cleaning this week, so it seemed a good time for the following reminders.

Decision Day!

If you received an offer of admission, you need to accept or decline our offer by the end of tomorrow, April 15.

If you’re accepted on or after April 15, please reply no later than three weeks from the date your offer is received.

In Person

Do you have a question you’d like to ask in person?  We are constantly updating our recruitment calendar. See when we might be in your area!

Comment Policy

We welcome your comments and opinions, but reserve the right to remove content that contains advertisements or commercial messages, are off-topic, or use offensive or inappropriate language. Comments that are defamatory, infringe the rights of others, or violate the law or University policy may also be removed.

This blog is administered by the Bloomberg School’s Admissions Services. If you have concerns about content, questions or comments, please direct them to jhsph.admiss@jhu.edu.

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It’s the fourth day of National Public Health Week (NPHW) and today’s theme is “Be the Healthiest Nation in One Generation.”

A few years ago, APHA put together a video that perfectly explains today’s theme. Some of the statistics are a few years old, but the message is still very relevant.

 

Apple in handsIt’s the fourth day of National Public Health Week (NPHW) and today’s theme is “Eat Well.”

Public health issues surrounding food include not only what we eat, but where we get it and how it’s produced.

These questions are so important, the Johns Hopkins Public Health magazine devoted this year’s special spring issue to food. In the web edition, you can read about bringing healthy food to urban food deserts, the problems of industrial farming, researchers trying to avoid future famines and more.

It’s great lunchtime reading. Feel free to browse while you eat your salad!