Skip Navigation

Academics

One-Week Courses

Below you will find information on the one-week courses offered on the Baltimore campus as part of the 2014 Winter Institute. You can also review the 2014 course schedule and classroom locations for the Baltimore courses.

January 6 - 10, 2014

Morning Courses

AN INTERDISCIPLINARY APPROACH TO UNDERSTANDING THE HEALTH OF AMERICAN INDIANS

221.667.13
8:00 a.m. - 1:00 p.m.
Kristen Speakman and Nadine Caron

Surveys the health status of American Indians and Alaskan Natives including their special genetic, cultural, social, and biomedical characteristics. Examines Indian culture, relation of the individual to the group, and Indian concepts of health and disease, emphasizing the blending of traditional Indian healing with modern Western methods.Student evaluation will be based on a group project and one quiz. (3 academic credits). Minimum enrollment 10.

INTRODUCTION TO R FOR PUBLIC HEALTH RESEARCHERS

140.886.13
8:30 a.m. - 12:00 Noon
Andrew E. Jaffe

Provides "hands-on" training for analyzing data in the R statistical software package, a popular open-source solution for data analysis and visualization.  Covers data input/output, data management and manipulation, and constructing useful and informative graphics.  Geared towards individuals who have never used R.  Consists of a 90 minute "interactive" lecture, followed by a 2 hour lab, where students apply the skills taught in the lecture to real data.  Student evaluation based on class participation, 3  take-home assignments and a final take-home project.(2 academic credits). Maximum enrollment 50, minimum 10.

PRINCIPLES OF OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY

182.631.13.
8:30 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.
Emory Knowles

Introduces the organizational framework in which safety sciences are practiced in the U,.S. Illustrates professional and scientific methodologies by focusing on selected substantive areas of practice (systems safety, nature of accidents, electrical hazards, fire and fire suppression, explosions and explosives, and falls and walking and working surfaces). Student evaluation based on a paper or exam. (2 academic credits).

Afternoon Courses

SPECIAL TOPICS IN HEALTH AND HUMAN RIGHTS: PUBLIC HEALTH IMPLICATIONS OF HEALTH AS A HUMAN RIGHT

180.600.13
1:30 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.
Robert Lawrence

Applies a human rights framework to the analysis of key determinants of health status and public health policies, programs and practices. Readings and discussions explore health as a human right and its implications for public health research and practice. The seminar focuses broadly on three areas: (1) health as a human right; (2) impact of public health policies, programs and practices on human rights; and (3) collective health impact of human rights violations, whether gross violations in human conflict or insidious violations associated with mistreatment of marginalized groups. Topics include: (1) international instruments defining human rights principles, their historical development and application; (2) operationalization of the right to health and its consequences for public health practice; (3) governmental obligations for health under international human rights law; (4) linkages between health and human rights; (5) application of the human rights framework to the design, implementation, and evaluation of public health policies and interventions; (6) collective health impact of human rights violations; (7) dilemmas in the application of human rights principles to public health research and practice. Student evaluation based on class participation, short assignments and one paper. (2 academic credits). Maximum enrollment 25, minimum 10.

DATA ANALYSIS WORKSHOP I

140.613.13
1:30 p.m. - 4:50 p.m.
Xiangrong Kong

This sequence of workshops (see also Data Analysis Workshop II) is intended for students with a broad understanding of biostatistical concepts used in public health sciences who seek to develop additional data analysis skills. The emphasis is on concepts and illustration of concepts applying a variety of analytic techniques to four to six public health datasets in a computer laboratory setting using STATA statistical software. In the first workshop, students learn basic methods of data organization/management and simple methods for data exploration, data editing, and graphical and tabular displays. Additional topics include comparison of means and proportions, simple linear regression and correlation. In the second workshop students will master more advanced methods of data including analysis of variance, analysis of covariance, nonparametric methods for comparing groups, multiple linear regression, logistic regression, log-linear regression and survival analysis. Students must have a laptop computer with STATA 11.0 installed.(2 academic credits) for each course. Maximum enrollment 30. Minimum enrollment 10. 

PROGRAM PLANNING FOR HEALTH BEHAVIOR CHANGE

410.620.13
1:30 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.
Vanya Jones

Provides an overview of the breadth of programs and diversity of settings in the filed of health education in health promotion, and an opportunity to develop skills in program planning. Explains the importance of health behavior as a contributor to current public health problems and the role of health education and health promotion programs in addressing them, drawing examples from the literature on community-based health education, patient education, school health, and work-site health promotion. Also discusses issues of ethical standards and quality assurance in health education and health promotion. Student evaluations based on class participation and a needs assessment and program plan. (3 academic credits). Minimum enrollment 7.

 

January 13 - 17, 2014

Morning Courses

MASS MEDIA for HEALTH PROMOTION IN AMERICAN INDIAN COMMUNITIES        

221.668.13
8:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.
Kristen Speakman and Rochelle Lacapa

Media specialists have designed a week-long workshop to train students in developing mass media campaigns directed at health promotion within American Indian communities.  Student evaluation:  Class participation, paper and final presentation. (2 academic credits).

Afternoon Courses 

MAJOR GLOBAL INFECTIOUS DISEASES: PROSPECTS FOR CONTROL

260.606.13
1:30 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.
Joseph Margolick

This course will provide in-depth information on the basic pathogenic mechanisms of selected infectious diseases that continue to be of major public health importance worldwide, with an emphasis on underlying problems for development of effective public health interventions. Topics covered will include HIV/AIDS, malaria, tuberculosis, measles, and infectious disease hazards that may become important in the future. Students taking this course will obtain a working knowledge of the biology of these diseases, including prospects for their effective management and control at both the individual and public health level, and of basic human immunology and vaccinology. Student evaluation will be based on class participation and responses to written questions. (2 academic credits). Minimum enrollment 10, maximum 25

DATA ANALYSIS WORKSHOP II

140.614.13
1:30 p.m. - 4:50 p.m.
Xiangrong Kong

This sequence of workshops (see also Data Analysis Workshop I) is intended for students with a broad understanding of biostatistical concepts used in public health sciences who seek to develop additional data analysis skills. The emphasis is on concepts and illustration of concepts applying a variety of analytic techniques to four to six public health datasets in a computer laboratory setting using STATA statistical software. In the first workshop, students learn basic methods of data organization/management and simple methods for data exploration, data editing, and graphical and tabular displays. Additional topics include comparison of means and proportions, simple linear regression and correlation. In the second workshop students will master more advanced methods of data including analysis of variance, analysis of covariance, nonparametric methods for comparing groups, multiple linear regression, logistic regression, log-linear regression and survival analysis. Students must have a laptop computer with STATA 11.0 installed. (2 academic credits for each course). Maximum enrollment 30. Minimum enrollment 10.