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Academics

Washington, D.C. Courses

These courses will be offered at the The Washington, DC Center (1717 Massachusetts Avenue, NW, Suite 104,Washington DC, 20036). Students registering for these courses will receive a separate confirmation from the Department of Health Policy and Management.

For more information on the 2013 Winter Institute courses being offered in Washington DC, please contact Pam Davis. You can also view the Washington, DC course schedule.

January 7 - 11, 2013

THE ROLE OF COMMUNITY-BASED AND NON-GOVERNMENTAL ORGANIZATIONS IN IMPROVING GLOBAL HEALTH

301.692.51
January 7 -9
8:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.
Paul Gaist

Since the 1990s, there has been a dramatic increase in the number of non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and community-based organizations (CBOs) around the world engaged in the response to public health issues such as HIV/AIDS, TB, and drug abuse. This course provides a working background and functional understanding of NGOs/CBOs in public health programs, as well as policy and management that will be applicable in both U.S. and international settings (private voluntary organizations [PVOs] are included under the headings of NGOs and CBOs). Taught via lectures, guest speakers, and a series of hands-on interactive training sessions. Student evaluation based on a final paper due within one month of the conclusion of the course on a date specific by the instructor.(3 academic credits). Maximum enrollment 28, minimum 7.

HEALTH ADVOCACY
301.645.51
January 7 - 9
8:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.
Joshua Horwitz

Prepares health professionals, (from government health officials, business leaders, non-profit organization representatives to scientists) to advance public health policy improvements. Through lectures, extensive group exercises and a "mock" congressional hearing, students develop the skills to evaluate the policymaking process, create opportunities to inform and influence policymaking, and become more effective in translating and communicating in a policymaking environment. After completion of this course, you will be able to: * Assess a public health problem and determine tactically when to solve the problem with policy strategies versus behavioral education; * Analyze the legislative, administrative and judicial intervention points for policymaking and identify where to effectively target advocacy efforts; * Identify and evaluate advocacy strategies, such as coalitions, grassroots, and paid and earned media outreach, in order to create specific advocacy campaigns; * Dissect policy-oriented communications and develop personal skills to effectively translate and advocate for public health improvements to policymakers, the press and the public. Students taking this course for graduate academic credit will be evaluated based on class participation, a group project and final paper.(3 academic credits). Maximum enrollment 50, minimum 8).

CASE STUDIES IN COMMUNICATING WITH THE MEDIA

301.771.51
January 9
8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.
John Burke

The ability to deal effectively with the mass media is an essential skill for institutions confronting a health emergency. In this age of instant global reporting, there is no time for on the job training, so professionals must prepare in advance to handle the media and keep the public informed. This course provides techniques and guidelines to understand and handle the media during a crisis. Topics to be discussed include: an overview of the media needs in a crisis, the essential elements of crisis communication plans, tips and techniques for spokespersons, common pitfalls to avoid, audience psychology, non verbal communication and techniques for communicating complex information to the lay audience. Students will review videotapes of news coverage and participate as spokespersons in videotaped simulation exercises.(1 academic credit). Maximum enrollment 30, minimum 10.

MAKING EFFECTIVE PUBLIC PRESENTATIONS

301.772.51
January 10 - 11
9:00 a.m. - 5 p.m.
John Burke

Enhances skills to construct and deliver oral presentations with clarity and impact. Provides a template for “audience-centered” presentation construction with examples, tools and exercises. Provides individual assessment and feedback for each participant through videotaped exercises and a short formal presentation constructed during the course. Student evaluation based on class presentation and self-critique evaluation submitted at the conclusion of the course. (2 academic credits). Minimum enrollment 8.

INTRODUCTION TO ETHICAL ISSUES IN HEALTH POLICY

300.868.51
January 10 - 11
9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.
Holly Taylor

Introduces students to the moral relevance of health and the use of ethics in the assessment of health policy.  Acquaints students with  a number of theories of justice.  Students explore contemporary health care and public health policy issues using the lens of ethical analysis to supplement other approaches to policy analysis.(2 academic credits).